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    Some good news from Barrington

    By: Hugh Brady On Thursday evening, April 5, 110 fired up NAMIans gathered at the Barrington library for a legislative town hall / forum on mental health issues. The evening kicked off with Jeanne Ang, Director of Community Heath for Advocate Health Care and Dr. Manorama M. Khare, PhD, Research Professor, University of Illinois College of Medicine presenting the latest Community Health Needs Assessment Research Results for the Barrington Area. Click here to read the

    A Diagnosis of Mental Illness Need Not End a College Career

    By Marjorie Baldwin | Mar. 19, 2018 A recent survey reports that 47% of adults living with schizophrenia drop out of college, compared to the 27% college dropout rate in the U.S. overall. Another study reports that students diagnosed with bipolar disorder are 70% more likely to drop out of college than students with no psychiatric diagnosis. My son was diagnosed with schizophrenia in his junior year of college. I was devastated by what I

    Showing Strength in the Face of Mental Illness

    By Jennifer Pellecchia | Apr. 11, 2018 My name is Jennifer, and I’ve lived with mental illness for most of my life. I’m diagnosed with major depressive disorder, anxiety and an eating disorder. I have high-functioning mental illness, so even at my worst, I appear to be at my best. I’ve been able to live a full life, and, on the outside, I seem to have everything together. My parents didn’t know, my family and

    Experiencing a Psychotic Break Doesn’t Mean You’re Broken

    By Laura Greenstein | Mar. 12, 2018 NAMI NATIONAL     Each year, about 100,000 youth and young adults experience psychosis for the first time. They might see or hear things that aren’t there. They may believe things that aren’t true. It’s like “having a nightmare while you’re awake,” describes Elyn Saks, a legal scholar and mental health-policy advocate. Unfortunately, when someone starts having these frightening experiences, doctors and medical professionals often tell them that

    How Depression Made Me a Man

    “Be strong!” “Toughen up!” “Don’t cry!” Never did someone stand over me as a kid and yell, “Let it out! It’s okay to cry! It’s human to hurt!” From my football coaches to my own father, it seems as though the social norm for men is to be some kind of impenetrable mountain of muscle that feels no pain and has no emotion. If we’re not hunting or fighting or eating a bloody, rare steak,

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